queensamwise:

friendly reminder to please remember some self-care today!!! go drink a big glass of water!!!! watch something that will make you laugh!!! go to bed an extra hour early if you can!!! hug something soft. pet a dog. i love you

artifuss:

musingofarose:

"Under Cover" by Coppi Barbieri, V magazine Aug 2007

SIZE FAT WITH THE SPIDER WEBS PLS

micdotcom:

The crisis in Gaza is so serious, it can be seen from space

International Space Station astronaut Alexander Gerst has posted his “saddest photo yet.” From all the way up in the thermosphere, ISS personnel orbiting 200 miles over the Middle East can see bombs and missiles exploding in Gaza and Israel as the two sides go to war.

Detailed explanation of the photo | Follow micdotcom 

zzthebean:

shephaestion:

glitterarygetsit:

Sevan Biçakçi, for all your tiny city in a magic ring needs. Also: frozen birds, enchanted pomegranates and creatures of the deep.

unsuccessfulmetalbenders:

*drops something on purpose in front of somebody im trying to get nasty with*

me: oh….. let me get that right quick

*hits that nicki minaj anaconda single cover art pose*

Big Mama Thornton - Hound Dog

You ain’t nothing but a hound dog (x)

(Source: fallsonamemory)

stephaniesaujon:

Constance Morewood
Music City Burlesque April 2014

stephaniesaujon:

Constance Morewood

Music City Burlesque April 2014

BREAKING: International Model Andrej Pejic Comes Out as Trans Woman, Will Now Go By Andreja Pejic

thepoliticalfreakshow:

International model, Andrej Pejic, announced via Entertainment Tonight and People magazine that she underwent sex reassignment surgery earlier this year. Now a trans woman, Pejic will go by the name Andreja.

After keeping transition secret for the past few months, Pejic wanted to come out publicly and be honest with the public. 

"I want to share my story with the world because I think I have a social responsibility," the 22-year-old told People. “I hope that by being open about this, it becomes less of an issue.”

Pejic rose to fame thanks to her androgynous appeal and ability to model female fashion almost seamlessly. She earned international acclaim in 2011 after walking in both men and women’s fashion shows for Jean Paul-Gaultier during Paris Fashion Week. Pejic followed the runway walks with stunning covers on Dossier JournalOut magazine and even landed on FHM’s annual 100 Sexiest Women in the World.

The gender-bending model work perplexed some but fascinated most — always leading to the question about her identity.

"For me it’s always been important to show it doesn’t matter what gender you are," Pejic told Out earlier this year. “It doesn’t define who you are. “

But despite all of her success as a male model, Pejic knew deep down that she was a woman. “I always dreamt of being a girl. One of my earliest memories is spinning around in my mom’s skirt trying to look like a ballerina.” In the same conversation with People, the model admits she has known her true gender since the age of 13. 

In a message on Facebook, Pejic thanked her fans for their support and understanding. ”I think we all evolve as we get older and that’s normal but I like to think that my recent transition hasn’t made me into a different individual. Same person, no difference at all just a different sex,” she wrote.

Pejic also reached out to the youth community who might be questioning their identity with a message of hope: 

"I would also like to to reach out to all young gender non-conforming youth out there: I know it’s hard, I’ve been there, but remember it’s your right to be accepted as what you identify with — you deserve the same respect as any other human being on this planet."

With her story out, Pejic can focus on her work as a model and budding actor. Following an appearance in David Bowie’s music video for “The Stars Are Out Tonight,” the model was cast in her first film role as one of Ariel’s sisters in Sofia Coppola’s adaptation of the Disney classic. 

ex0skeletal:

randomlancila:

My friend @murphmanfa sums up my feelings about 50 Shades of Grey PERFECTLY. I like my share of problematic things, but far too many women read these books and don’t KNOW they’re problematic, and believe that THAT is how bdsm works. It absolutely is not. Christian is abusive, manipulative, and is a downright bully. In a true dom/sub relationship, I would even go as far as to say that the sub is the one with the real power. They set the limits. A true dom will never bully you, never guilt you, never make you feel bad about saying no, and never ignore limits. You should never fear your dom. The amount of women who want a relationship like the one portrayed in the books frankly scares me. Absolute consent. Absolute limits. Absolute mutual respect. A dom who searches for a pushover is not a dom at all, but instead someone who gets off on abusing women and pretends it’s under the guise of kink. Do not trust any dom who enjoys 50 Shades of Grey. If you enjoy this series as a bit of throwaway reading, that’s cool, we all have our guilty pleasures. But do NOT ignore the problematic elements. Hope this helps. (I enjoy bdsm and kink in general so I feel I have some authority to say these things.)

Yes.

ex0skeletal:

randomlancila:

My friend @murphmanfa sums up my feelings about 50 Shades of Grey PERFECTLY. I like my share of problematic things, but far too many women read these books and don’t KNOW they’re problematic, and believe that THAT is how bdsm works. It absolutely is not. Christian is abusive, manipulative, and is a downright bully. In a true dom/sub relationship, I would even go as far as to say that the sub is the one with the real power. They set the limits. A true dom will never bully you, never guilt you, never make you feel bad about saying no, and never ignore limits. You should never fear your dom. The amount of women who want a relationship like the one portrayed in the books frankly scares me. Absolute consent. Absolute limits. Absolute mutual respect. A dom who searches for a pushover is not a dom at all, but instead someone who gets off on abusing women and pretends it’s under the guise of kink. Do not trust any dom who enjoys 50 Shades of Grey. If you enjoy this series as a bit of throwaway reading, that’s cool, we all have our guilty pleasures. But do NOT ignore the problematic elements. Hope this helps. (I enjoy bdsm and kink in general so I feel I have some authority to say these things.)

Yes.

Most girls are relentlessly told that we will be treated how we demand to be treated. If we want respect, we must respect ourselves.

This does three things. Firstly, it gets men off the hook for being held accountable for how they treat women. And secondly, it makes women feel that the mistreatment and sometimes outright violence they face due to their gender is primarily their fault. And thirdly, it positions women to be unable to speak out against sexism because we are made to believe any sexism we experience would not have happened if we had done something differently.

I cannot demand a man to respect me. No more than I can demand that anybody do anything. I can ask men to be nice to me. But chances are if I even have to ask he does not care to be nice. I can express displeasure when I’m not being respected. But that doesn’t solve the issue that I was disrespected in the first place.

I can choose to not deal with a man once he proves to be disrespectful and/or sexist. But even that does not solve the initial problem of the fact that I had to experience being disrespected in the first place.

As a young girl, I wish that instead of being told that I needed to demand respect from men that I had been told that when I am not respected by men that it’s his fault and not mine. But that would require that we quit having numerous arbitrary standards for what it means to be a “respectable” woman. It would mean that I am not judged as deserving violence based on how I speak, what I wear, what I do, and who I am.

thelingerielesbian:

lucy-corsetry:

waistedlives:

Comparing Lingerie
Click through to high res for readability!
Mislabeling happens, which is understandable because sometimes information like this can be hard to find, manufacturers intentionally or unintentionally (through receiving misinformation themselves) mislabel, and some of it is just plain confusing!
This is by no means meant to be an absolute guide to what definitely is and is not a certain garment, it’s just some general guidelines that these garments usually follow. (Things like closures, boning type, and sizing often vary by manufacturer and style.) It also doesn’t include nearly every type of lingerie and shapewear, as there is so much out there! This is just meant to clear up a few common misconceptions. <3
If you’re a more visual person, here are picture examples of all of the garments listed!
Corset:

Electra Designs
Fashion Corset:

Frederick’s of Hollywood
Faja/Latex Cincher:

FajaShop
Longline Bra:

Betsey Johnson
Bustier:

Jezebel
Crop Top/Outerwear Bustier:

Forever 21
Basque:

Bravissimo
Girdle:

What Katie Did

Fantastic!

Genuinely helpful!

thelingerielesbian:

lucy-corsetry:

waistedlives:

Comparing Lingerie

Click through to high res for readability!

Mislabeling happens, which is understandable because sometimes information like this can be hard to find, manufacturers intentionally or unintentionally (through receiving misinformation themselves) mislabel, and some of it is just plain confusing!

This is by no means meant to be an absolute guide to what definitely is and is not a certain garment, it’s just some general guidelines that these garments usually follow. (Things like closures, boning type, and sizing often vary by manufacturer and style.) It also doesn’t include nearly every type of lingerie and shapewear, as there is so much out there! This is just meant to clear up a few common misconceptions. <3

If you’re a more visual person, here are picture examples of all of the garments listed!

Corset:

Electra Designs

Fashion Corset:

Frederick’s of Hollywood

Faja/Latex Cincher:

FajaShop

Longline Bra:

Betsey Johnson

Bustier:

Jezebel

Crop Top/Outerwear Bustier:

Forever 21

Basque:

Bravissimo

Girdle:

What Katie Did

Fantastic!

Genuinely helpful!

nicterhorstsketch:

I animated a little shimmy during a livestream tonight! Check it out.
I’m not gonna lie, I’m really happy with those nipple tassels.

Also, if you think this is fun, please support me! I want to keep these livestreams archived, and allow everyone to view the archive without a livestream account, as well as make more time for fun little things like this, and donations will help me do all of those things! :)
Patreon | Facebook | Livestream | Etsy | Pintrest | Portfolio

nicterhorstsketch:

I animated a little shimmy during a livestream tonight! Check it out.

I’m not gonna lie, I’m really happy with those nipple tassels.

Also, if you think this is fun, please support me! I want to keep these livestreams archived, and allow everyone to view the archive without a livestream account, as well as make more time for fun little things like this, and donations will help me do all of those things! :)

Patreon | Facebook | Livestream | Etsy | Pintrest | Portfolio

missdee20:

It’s been, like, a month since I dawned the feathers for my very first burlesque performance with the geekenders. I had it in my mind that I would write a wise introspective right afterwards. Talk about my dance, my costume, how it felt to be on stage, what I would change next time, etc. But, to be frank, I totally had an out of body experience during the performance. Like, I came off the stage and had to ask someone if the audience clapped. She told me they not only clapped, they hooted, hollered and generally went nuts for my Iago. 
So that’s cool. But let me tell you what happened afterwards. Afterwards is actually the most important part of this story. Afterwards is why I will continue to dance and be a naked fool on stage. Afterwards is why I will always speak up when someone complains about neo-burlesque and nerdlesque. 
After the performance, I felt like I was born again. I had a new body and a new attitude and a new spring in my step. I have never been comfortable in my own skin, even after owning it for almost 30 years, so this was a big thing.
And what’s great is, even a month after the show, I still feel that way. Confident. Proud. Ready to kick ass and take names. I have begun to care more about myself. Which sounds egotistical, but it is something that a lot of women out there still don’t know how to do. I buy myself pretty clothing because I feel pretty. I wear make-up not for attention of others, but for myself. 
The geekenders took a chance on a pudgy awkward gal with a pocketful of derp face. And now she’s still a pudgy gal, but she fucking rocks that derp face. 
So, to the people who turn up their nose at the neo-burlesque movement - to the people who dismiss it as “A Bunch Of Fat Girls Who Take Their Clothes Off” - to the people who say there’s too much of it in Vancouver - I gotta tell you that this form of entertainment is not so much for you as it is for the performers. It gives them a chance to feel powerful, confident, and alive in a world where we are constantly shamed about what we are and what we look like.
Maybe I won’t get to dance all the time, but I will paint sets, sew costumes, do anything to help more people (no matter what the gender or sex or body type) find themselves on stage.
So, thank you again geekenders for promoting a safe space where new performers can grow. Thank you to my dear sweet helper monkey, Jaime - the stage mom/friend who really got me confident enough to step on stage. Thank you to the Rio Theatre for always finding a space for burlesque, especially the nerdy kind. Thank you audience members who hoot and holler and cheer for everyone on stage. Thank you Vancouver for being a kind place to bloom.
Lots of love,
Miss Dee Twenty
(PS: More performance photos from the lovely René Blais Photography can be found here)

missdee20:

It’s been, like, a month since I dawned the feathers for my very first burlesque performance with the geekenders. I had it in my mind that I would write a wise introspective right afterwards. Talk about my dance, my costume, how it felt to be on stage, what I would change next time, etc. But, to be frank, I totally had an out of body experience during the performance. Like, I came off the stage and had to ask someone if the audience clapped. She told me they not only clapped, they hooted, hollered and generally went nuts for my Iago. 

So that’s cool. But let me tell you what happened afterwards. Afterwards is actually the most important part of this story. Afterwards is why I will continue to dance and be a naked fool on stage. Afterwards is why I will always speak up when someone complains about neo-burlesque and nerdlesque. 

After the performance, I felt like I was born again. I had a new body and a new attitude and a new spring in my step. I have never been comfortable in my own skin, even after owning it for almost 30 years, so this was a big thing.

And what’s great is, even a month after the show, I still feel that way. Confident. Proud. Ready to kick ass and take names. I have begun to care more about myself. Which sounds egotistical, but it is something that a lot of women out there still don’t know how to do. I buy myself pretty clothing because I feel pretty. I wear make-up not for attention of others, but for myself. 

The geekenders took a chance on a pudgy awkward gal with a pocketful of derp face. And now she’s still a pudgy gal, but she fucking rocks that derp face. 

So, to the people who turn up their nose at the neo-burlesque movement - to the people who dismiss it as “A Bunch Of Fat Girls Who Take Their Clothes Off” - to the people who say there’s too much of it in Vancouver - I gotta tell you that this form of entertainment is not so much for you as it is for the performers. It gives them a chance to feel powerful, confident, and alive in a world where we are constantly shamed about what we are and what we look like.

Maybe I won’t get to dance all the time, but I will paint sets, sew costumes, do anything to help more people (no matter what the gender or sex or body type) find themselves on stage.

So, thank you again geekenders for promoting a safe space where new performers can grow. Thank you to my dear sweet helper monkey, Jaime - the stage mom/friend who really got me confident enough to step on stage. Thank you to the Rio Theatre for always finding a space for burlesque, especially the nerdy kind. Thank you audience members who hoot and holler and cheer for everyone on stage. Thank you Vancouver for being a kind place to bloom.

Lots of love,

Miss Dee Twenty

(PS: More performance photos from the lovely René Blais Photography can be found here)